07.10.2020 – DAVID OLUSOGA IN CONVERSATION: BLACK HISTORY MATTERS, online event

September 29, 2020

This is a live online event. Bookers will be sent a link to join in their confirmation email. 

The murder of George Floyd in the US reverberated around the world. It gave way to an explosion of protest, and a closer examination among historians of the systemic racism in the way the African diaspora is described. Cultural institutions around the world are examining their own legacy within the history of colonialism and imperialism. Join historian David Olusoga in conversation for his personal perspective on how we memorialise, teach and write about racism, and why black British history matters.

Professor David Olusoga is a British-Nigerian historian, broadcaster and BAFTA award-winning presenter and filmmaker. He is Professor of Public History at the University of Manchester and a regular contributor to the GuardianObserverNew Statesman and BBC History Magazine. The author of several books including Black and British: A Forgotten History and A House Through Time, he was also a contributor to The Oxford Companion to Black British History. In 2019 he was awarded the OBE for services to history and community integration. David’s new children’s book, Black and British: A Short Essential History has recently been published.

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Details

Name:David Olusoga in Conversation: Black History Matters
Where:Online
When:Wed 7 Oct 2020, 19:30 – 20:30
Price:Free Event: £0.00
Enquiries:+44 (0)1937 546546
[email protected]
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