Wiley permanently suspended by Twitter over anti-Semitism

July 29, 2020

BBC News, 29 July 2020

Wiley performs on stage during day 2 of South West Four Festival 2019 at Clapham Common on August 25, 2019 in London, England.

Grime artist Wiley has been permanently banned from Twitter, five days after posting anti-Semitic remarks.

It follows a 48-hour boycott of Twitter by many users over what they said had been an unacceptable delay in dealing with the offending tweets.

“We are sorry we did not move faster,” Twitter said in a statement.

The escalation comes a day after Facebook and Instagram deleted the music star’s accounts for “repeated violations” of their rules.

Twitter said it has taken a similar step because the artist had broken its “hateful conduct” policy.

The San Francisco-based firm had previously temporarily suspended Wiley and left many of his past tweets visible. But it said it had decided to now make the ban permanent, and wipe all his past posts from its platform “upon further consideration”.

“We deeply respect the concerns shared by the Jewish community and online safety advocates,” the statement said, promising to continue to tackle anti-Semitism.

Wiley’s series of anti-Semitic tweets appeared on Friday night. 

One tweet read: “I don’t care about Hitler, I care about black people”, and compared the Jewish community to the Ku Klux Klan.

The star, known as the “godfather of grime”, was awarded an MBE for services to music in 2018.

But Twitter did not delete that or other tweets, or issue its first temporary ban, until later in the weekend.

Recent posts
Lewis Hamilton's priority in 2021 is to increase diversity in F1
“I got into racing because I love racing, that’s got to be at the core of what I do. If all you’re going for is accolades, for titles, I feel I could potentially lose my way.
BLACK PEOPLE'S DAY OF ACTION - 40 YEARS ON
The historically significant day, in 1981, saw over 20,000 people march across London seeking justice for the victims of the New Cross Fire, which had broken out six weeks prior. The tragic Fire had resulted in the death of thirteen black teenagers on the night, and a further death months later. Despite many signs and witness accounts indicating that the fire was racially motivated, the police failed to make any charges.