AUGUST 7: WEBINAR: The African History of Sport 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

July 19, 2020

In this webinar, Black History Studies will reveal the hidden history of Africa’s contribution to World Sport and Games. This rich history is under researched and virtually ignored compared to Greek/Classical history of sport; but is fundamentally significant, since nearly all of today’s blue ribbon sport originated in Nile Valley Civilisations. This informative and inspirational presentation will take you on a journey to Africa, 3000 – 5000 years ago, to uncover the origins of sport, a little of which you may have heard about; but most of which is unknown. In this journey, we are going to connect ancient and modern sport heritage.

THIS IS NOT TO BE MISSED.

This webinar will take place on Friday 7th August 2020 from 7pm to 9pm.

Tickets for this webinar cost £5.00 per person.

Location: This is a WEBINAR via Zoom. The Zoom link will be provided upon registration.

*** THE PRESENTATION STARTS AT 19:00 UK TIME. PLEASE JOIN THE WEBINAR ON TIME VIA ZOOM TO AVOID MISSING OUT ***

Things to note:

– This webinar will not be recorded.

– By signing up, you are agreeing to be added to the – Black History Studies mailing list (please drop us a note if you’d like not to be).

– Tickets for this webinar are non-refundable and non-transferable.

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