UN Decade for People of African Descent

July 13, 2020

UN INTERNATIONAL DECADE FOR PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT, 2015 – 2024

On 07/02/2014, the United Nations proclaimed 

… the International Decade for People of African Descent, commencing on 1 January 2015 and ending on 31 December 2024, with the theme “People of African descent: recognition, justice and development”. 

The objectives for the Decade are to, “Promote respect, protection and fulfilment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by people of African Descent, as recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; promote a greater knowledge of and respect for the diverse heritage, culture and contribution of people of African descent to the development of societies; adopt and strengthen national, regional and international legal frameworks according to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and to ensure their full and effective implementation.”

There is a programme of activities for implementation by state parties (members of the UN) including, “ensuring the completion of the construction and the inauguration…of a permanent memorial at UN Headquarters to honour the memory of the victims of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade.” Unfortunately, the United Kingdom declined to participate in the Decade and its activities.

The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination Report of 03/10/2016 on the UK notes that It also regrets that the State party does not intend to adopt any activities or plans for the 2015-2024 International Decade for People of African Descent (arts. 2 and 5).”

Recent posts
JAMAICANS LIVING IN UKRAINE WHEN RUSSIA INVADED IN FEBRUARY, SHARE THEIR ACCOUNTS (2022)
On February 25, 2022, Russia invaded Ukraine. Many students from African and Caribbean nations were trapped in Ukraine, due to the suddenness of the invasion. Here, some Jamaicans share their accounts.
CHERRY NATURAL (JAMAICA) SPOKEN WORD
Cherry Natural considers herself as a feminist dub poet or activist, and her sources of inspiration include the late Jamaican poet Louise Bennett. Louise Bennett is well-known as the first Caribbean poet who used Creole or patois consistently and to great effect in her ballads, and who relentlessly stood up for the people's language as opposed to standard English which was then considered as the only passport to social elevation.